Author Archives: Matt Jackson

Land and Heritage 25 year plan appraisal

The 25 year Environment Plan – Armageddon or Paradise?

An alarming warning comes from Spring Watch presenter Chris Packham this week (read it here), concerning the gulf between wildlife diversity in our nature reserves and that within the wider countryside.

All of this comes about from 70 years of agricultural intensification, urban sprawl and infrastructure expansion. Our network of Nature Reserves is piecemeal, widely scattered and has no strategic plan or design. All the studies of wildlife populations and distributions show that our current protection measures are simply inadequate. When was it decided that wildlife should be looked after within nature reserves and everything else could be trashed?. Oh and by the way there is no money for managing nature reserves as they are “unproductive”.

Farmers, have been all too happy to call themselves “the guardians of the countryside” but have clearly failed on an epic scale. Continue reading

Land-and-Heritage-collections-consultation-with-the-Army-Chaplaincy-Museum

Army Museums into the Future

There are over 140 army museums and collections in the UK, which does not include air or naval forces. Some are vast, with enormous items on show such as the Tank Museum, and some are really quite small, perhaps forming part of a larger museum. None of them are insignificant. 

Land and Heritage collections work with Army Museums Ogliby TrustIn April 2018 Land and Heritage published an Army Museums National Scoping Report, which looked at the significance, condition and financial resilience of all 140 plus museums. Matt and Clare were commissioned in July 2017 by the Army Museums Ogilby Trust to undertake this, which formed part of their larger resilience project ‘Army Museums into the Future’. As an interpretation and collections specialist Clare was able to make a thorough assessment of just how well the army museums care for their treasures, and what support they might need going forward. 

The UK army museums scoping project made contact with a wide and diverse selection of army museums, and the results have returned some very useful, positive information. The Army Museums Ogibly Trust website has an entry for all of the 142 individual museums and collections surveyed, and acts as a portal for researchers and visitors to locate an army collection, and find out more information. This facility is due to be launched by the Trust shortly.

The project has highlighted some very positive trends, and some truly amazing numbers, for example: 

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Ecology, archaeology, landscape architects and architects at the South West Land and Heritage Symposium at The Garden House, Devon

South West Land and Heritage Symposium

The South West Land and Heritage Syposium at The Garden House, Buckland Monachorum, Devon

Land and Heritage have just hosted the first South West Land and Heritage Symposium at The Garden House, Buckland Monachorum, Devon. This networking event brought together professionals from the land heritage sector including gardeners, landscape architects, ecologists and archaeologists to highlight a few.

The South West Land and Heritage Symposium delegates at The Garden House, Devon

Simon Humphreys, Director of Land and Heritage, opened with these words:  Continue reading

Keeping trees safe and well; what’s expected of owners and managers?

Oak tree in the landscape at Bodnant garden

A mature oak tree frames a vista on the lawn at Bodnant Garden, North Wales

What makes a tree safe?

When it comes to working on trees it is often a highly emotive subject, especially when they are in very public places, and have powerful connections to community. When a tree fails it can have devastating effect, and yet it is common to see sadly unnecessary interventions to healthy trees, simply on the grounds of ‘safety’.

Professional tree inspectors never assess a tree as safe, they will weigh up many factors to judge likelihood of failure. As a complex natural organism, there are external signs that an inspector can use to determine tree health, from a simple bulge in the trunk to a fruiting fungal body within the tree. A rounded bulge to one side can indicate internal decay, or a vertical rib can mean that a long internal crack is present, each of which can alter the structural capabilities. There are aggressive fungi and passive ones, each having  unique decay outcomes, telling us much more about the complex event.
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